16 September 2014

Shipping is the lifeblood of the global economy, 90% of world trade is seaborne and is carried on technically sophisticated, high value assets. The global merchant navy consists of some 50,000 ships and it takes more than 1million officers and ratings to man this large fleet. All of which, have to be highly educated and trained. There are also many millions of shore based personnel who task it is to manage and operate this enormous fleet safely, paying particular attention to the environment.

The primary reason for my visit to South Africa is to promote Professional Education in Shipping through the Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers, Education and Training programmes.

I shall be meeting personnel from all sectors of the shipping community in order to discuss how the ICS can further assist our South African colleagues in meeting our mutual targets and objectives of professionalism in the shipping industry.

Visits are planned to the School of Shipping, in Cape Town, and to Sithengile Secondary School, in Durban, where we bring shipping to the classroom. I will also have the opportunity to meet some of our students and to present awards to those who have been successful in passing our very difficult examinations.

Finally a new education programme called “High Tide”, which was first launched about 2 years ago in the North East coast of England, where un-employment is at about 40%, will be launched in South Africa during my visit. This exciting project is aimed at under-privileged school children between the age of 8 and 18. The programme shows boys and girls what great opportunities the shipping industry can offer to those interested in a truly global industry.

Bruce Ogilvy F.I.C.S
Vice President ICS